Advisory: Advocacy groups, Indigenous leaders to hold webinar critiquing Procter & Gamble's 'Our Home' climate initiative

Advisory: Advocacy groups, Indigenous leaders to hold webinar critiquing Procter & Gamble's 'Our Home' climate initiative

Tuesday October 06, 2020

10am PT / 1pm ET Wednesday, October 7: "The Truth about Procter & Gamble's impacts on forests and communities" webinar features advocacy groups, youth activists, and indigenous leaders exposing P&G's destructive forestry and poor labor practices

CINCINNATI, OHIO — Procter & Gamble is one of the largest companies in the world. Unfortunately, the company causes significant harm to climate-critical forests, endangered species, and indigenous and frontline communities for the products we all use — like toilet paper, soap, and beauty products. When launching its “Our Home” climate initiative earlier this year to become “carbon neutral” in its direct operations, Procter & Gamble conveniently downplayed the massive impacts it has on the places it sources its fiber and palm oil, focusing instead on funding flashy projects like restoring mangroves and planting trees. 

Join advocacy groups Stand.earth, NRDC, Friends of the Earth, Rainforest Action Network, David Suzuki Foundation, and Wildlands League, joined by youth activists, and Indigenous and frontline leaders from Canada and Southeast Asia for a virtual webinar on Wednesday, October 7, to uncover what P&G forgot to tell the world during the launch of its “Our Home” initiative. You’ll learn more about the ways Indigenous communities have been historically impacted by destructive forestry and poor labor practices, and you’ll hear from environmental advocates worldwide who are pushing Procter & Gamble to stop greenwashing and start taking responsible action. 

This webinar could not be more perfectly timed, as Procter & Gamble executives face mounting pressure from green investor groups to implement better forest sourcing practices, including a shareholder resolution (page 78) that will be voted on at the company’s upcoming shareholder meeting on October 13. See what activists are planning on the ground at P&G's HQ in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the week leading up to the annual meeting.

In Canada, Procter & Gamble’s flagship brands like Charmin toilet paper and Bounty paper towels are driving the loss and fragmentation of the boreal forest — a climate-critical ecosystem known as the “Amazon of the north” that stores more carbon per hectare than just about any other forest on Earth. Despite pressure from environmental advocates and Indigenous communities, Procter & Gamble has continually failed to set time-bound goals to stop sourcing from Canadian suppliers that fail to meet federal habitat 65% intactness guidelines established to advance the survival of caribou — a threatened species. The company turned a blind eye when caribou, an important species that indicates the broader health of the boreal forest, were listed as threatened due to habitat loss and fragmentation. The company is also failing to require its suppliers to adhere to the principles of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent when sourcing from traditional territories of First Nations.

In Indonesia and Malaysia, Procter & Gamble brands including Ivory soap and Oil of Olay can be linked to palm oil suppliers that are known to be actively causing or contributing to deforestation and human rights violations in their commodity production or processing operations. Earlier this month, an Associated Press investigation revealed that P&G sources from palm oil suppliers who use forced labor and other horrific labor practices in Malaysia.

What: "The Truth about Procter & Gamble's impacts on forests and communities" webinar critiquing P&G's "Our Home" climate initiative

When: Wednesday, October 7, 10-11:30 a.m. Pacific time / 1- 2:30 p.m. Eastern time

Where: RSVP at http://bit.ly/TruthAboutProcterGamble. A recording will be available at facebook.com/standearth

Who: Advocacy groups Stand.earth, NRDC, Friends of the Earth, Rainforest Action Network, David Suzuki Foundation, and Wildlands League, joined by youth activists, and Indigenous and frontline leaders from Canada and Southeast Asia

Speakers in Canada & the US include:

  • Moderator: Tzeporah Berman, Stand.earth International Program Director and one of the 2019 winners of the Climate Breakthrough Project
  • Shelley Vinyard, Boreal Corporate Campaign Manager at NRDC: On the ground impacts, Investment risks and opportunities
  • Joe Fobister, Grassy Narrows First Nation: Indigenous concerns connected to resource extraction in boreal Canada and the importance of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) 
  • Dave Pearce, Forest Conservation Manager at Wildlands League: Deforestation risk in U.S. supply-chains coming from Canada (with a special focus on Ontario)
  • Rachel Plotkin, David Suzuki Foundation: Forest reforms critical for climate, First Nations and threatened species
  • Trison Braithwaite, Youth Activist: P&G leadership and real commitments are what we and my generation needs
  • Surprise guests from P&G’s hometown of Cincinnati

Speakers in Southeast Asia include:

  • Brihannala Morgan, Senior Forest Campaigner at RAN: Deforestation and human rights violations in P&G’s palm oil supply chains
  • Jeff Conant Senior International Forests Program Manager at Friends of the Earth U.S.: Introducing speakers from Indonesia
  • Community representative, Walhi/Friends of the Earth Central Sulawesi in Indonesia: Land grabbing and suppression of dissent in P&G’s supply chains
  • Dimas Hartono, Executive Director, Walhi/Friends of the Earth Central Kalimantan in Indonesia: Corruption, landgrabbing and deforestation impacts from the frontlines

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Media contact: Virginia Cleaveland, Stand.earth, media@stand.earth, +1 510 858 9902 (PDT)